Residential and commercial development

Here human intrusions includes recreational activities and civil unrest. Although recreational activities can have very positive effects on biodiversity by providing much-needed income for protected areas, they can have a negative impact if not managed effectively. For example, intensive recreational facilities such as campgrounds often result in the removal of the local vegetation a fuel wood for camp fires. Because conifers are a common component in mountainous regions where they often dominate, they are particularly vulnerable to the development of winter sport activities such as ski resorts.  Over 90% of the major armed conflicts between 1950 and 2000 occurred within countries containing biodiversity hotspots, and more than 80% took place directly within hotspot areas. Civil unrest can have a serious negative impact on biodiversity.  The Việt Nam war used poisonous Agent Orange as an aerial forest defoliant in which 14% of the forest cover was affected.

Taxa in the category - Residential and commercial development:

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Abies delavayi subsp. fansipanensis (Q.P.Xiang) Rushforth

This subspecies, described in 1997, is restricted to a single mountain in Northern Việt Nam. The main threats are its small population size and restricted distribution which make it potentially susceptible to stochastic events.  Read full species entry >

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Abies pinsapo Boiss.

The Spanish fir has two subspecies distributed in southern Spain and northern Morocco where threats include fire, grazing and climate change. Read full species entry >

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Abies pinsapo var. marocana (Trabut) Ceballos & Bolanos

The Moroccan fir is restricted to two small forests in the Rif Mountains of northern Morocco where over a period of 60 years it has suffered a 70% decline. Read full species entry >

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Amentotaxus argotaenia (Hance) Pilg

A widespread species that only ever occurs in small isolated populations. It is currently assessed as Near Threatened due to range wide deforestation. Read full species entry >

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Amentotaxus assamica D.K.Ferguson

Poorly known species endemic to India where threats include forest clearance for agriculture, logging, firewood collection and infrastructure development Read full species entry >

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Calocedrus macrolepis Kurz

A widespread species that has been exploited for timber and resin. Difficulties in estimating the extent of its decline and a lack of information about its staus is some parts of its range have resulted in an assessment of Near Threatened. Read full species entry >

Foliage
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Cedrus libani A.Rich.

Native to mountains adjacent to the north-eastern Mediterranean coast in Turkey, Syria and Lebanon. Threats include pathogens, fire, urbanisation, selective felling, activities associated with winter sports and grazing. Read full species entry >

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Cephalotaxus hainanensis H.L.Li

Restricted to the island of Hainan, China where the main threat has been exploitation of the bark and leaves for the valuable medicinal extracts. Habitat conversion and deforestation are now the most current threats Read full species entry >

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