Invasive species

The NW North America Threatened Conifer Region extends from British Columbia in Canada down the Pacific coast as far south as San Francisco and with a southern inland limit of Fresno. The western slopes of the Rocky Mountains form the eastern limit. It encompasses major mountain ranges including the Cascades, Sierra Nevada and the Transverse Ranges in southern California. It also includes the Klamath-Siskiyou region which bridges the coastal mountain ranges of California and Oregon and the Pacific Coast Ranges. The Region is one of the most diverse areas in the world for temperate conifers and is especially famous for having some of the most enormous conifers in the world, namely Sequoia sempervirens and Sequoiadendron giganteum. Much of the area is included in the Biodiversity Hotspot of the Californian Floristic Province and is characterised by cool, wet  winters and hot, dry summers with many conifers in the coastal forests reliant on persistent summer fog. Threats in this Region include fragmentation of forests and reductions in population sizes due to historic logging and forestry management practices that favour particular species, urbanisation, grazing and the introduction of exotic pests and diseases. Many years of fire suppression and other management practices have caused high-intensity fires which has led to the loss of large areas of conifer forests.

Taxa in the category - Invasive species:

Page 1 of 6 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›
 world map

blob indicating Eastern and southeastern USA	 on map

Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.

Distributed in three States of eastern USA but as a result of severe infestation from the Balsam woolly adelgid, only one population remains unaffected Read full species entry >

 world map

blob indicating Japan, Korea and Far East	 on map

Abies koreana E.H.Wilson

Endemic to four mountains in South Korea, the population suffers a range of threats including climate change, introduced pathogens and invasive native and non-native plants Read full species entry >

 world map

blob indicating Western Mediterranean on map

Abies pinsapo Boiss.

The Spanish fir has two subspecies distributed in southern Spain and northern Morocco where threats include fire, grazing and climate change. Read full species entry >

 world map

blob indicating Western Mediterranean on map

Abies pinsapo var. marocana (Trabut) Ceballos & Bolanos

The Moroccan fir is restricted to two small forests in the Rif Mountains of northern Morocco where over a period of 60 years it has suffered a 70% decline. Read full species entry >

 world map

blob indicating Southwest Pacific on map

Agathis montana de laub.

Endemic to the Mt. Panié range in northern New Caledonia where recent research has found that the decline and loss of old-growth trees is probably due to a combination of factors including root damage by feral pigs, pathogen attack and climate change. Read full species entry >

 world map

blob indicating Temperate southern America on map

Araucaria araucana (Molina) K. Koch

Endemic to southern Argentina and Chile where it mainly occurs in the Andes. Threats include fire, grazing and encroachment from commercial plantations of exotic species. Read full species entry >

 world map

blob indicating Australasia on map

Araucaria heterophylla (Salisb.) Franco

Endemic to Australia (Norfolk Island Group) where historical logging and forest clearance significantly reduced the population. Today the main threats relate to the impacts of invasive non-native species. Read full species entry >

 world map

blob indicating Southwest Pacific on map

Araucaria humboldtensis J. Buchholz

One of 13 species of Araucaria endemic to New Caledonia where it is restricted to less than five locations. There has been a recent decline in the health of some high altitude stands. Read full species entry >

Page 1 of 6 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›