Energy production and Infrastructure development

Energy production and infrastructure development can have a severe detrimental effect on conifer habitats.  A recent surge in the global demand for metals has led to an increase in mining activities with open-cast mining or strip-mining and its associated activities causing severe environmental damage.  Conifer-rich forests are often affected by this type of mining for example, nickel mining on the Pacific island of New Caledonia. Hydroelectric schemes often cause habitat loss due to forest inundation or indirectly by the loss of downstream habitats through changes in water levels.  Over the past 100 years hydroelectric schemes are responsible for a 15% habitat loss of Lagarostrobos franklinii forest in Tasmania.  Logging activities invariably start with the construction of roads in order to gain access to timber and this can include up to 15% of the consumed logged area. This intrusion is often devastating, opening up the area for further development and as communities grow more infrastructure and services are required.

Taxa in the category - Energy production and Infrastructure development:

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Juniperus recurva var coxii (A.B.Jacks.) Melville

A graceful weeping tree from SW China and the adjoining Himalayas. Large trees are now rare as its timber has been highly valued for coffins and furniture. Currently it is assessed as Near Threatened. Read full species entry >

Bark detail
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Keteleeria evelyniana Mast.

Although widely distributed in southern China, Lao PDR and Việt Nam, natural populations have undergone a significant decline mainly due to the conversion of its habitat for agriculture and logging.  Read full species entry >

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Neocallitropsis pancheri (Carriere) de Laub.

A genus with a single species which is endemic to New Caledonia where it is endangered due to fire and mining Read full species entry >

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Parasitaxus usta (Vieill.) de Laub.

This, the only known parasitic conifer species is endemic to New Caledonia where it's host is the conifer Falcatifolium taxoides. Read full species entry >

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Podocarpus affinis Seem.

Podocarpus affinis has a restricted extent of occurrence (ca. 1,400 km2) well within the threshold for listing as Endangered under the B1 criterion. It is known from more than five locations and the subpopulations are not severely fragmented as defined under the IUCN Red List Guidelines. There is likely to have been some recent decline in the quality of its habitat in parts of its range due to deforestation and forest clearance. The extent of the decline is uncertain. At this stage an assessment of Near Threatened seems most appropriate (almost qualifies under B1ab(iii)). Read full species entry >

Near Mt Tomanivi
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Podocarpus buchii Urban

Endemic to the Dominican Republic and Haiti where it is mainly threatened by habitat loss due to agriculture, logging, fire and tornadoes. Read full species entry >

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Podocarpus lophatus de Laub.

Restricted to two mountains in the Philippines where mining and deforestation are potential threats Read full species entry >

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