Cupressaceae

Direct exploitation occurs through general logging (deforestation), selective logging or the use of forest non-timber products (FNTP’s). General logging is the biggest threat to conifer species whereby forest habitats are often replaced by plantations, settlements or agricultural land. Selective logging involves the removal of individual tree species for their valuable timber, for charcoal production or fire wood. This practise is often considered to be a sustainable alternative to clear-cutting however, for every tree removed 30 more will become severely damaged because the practise of selective logging is inherently destructive. Conifers play an important role in the production of non-timber products, one example is the use of the foliage and bark of Taxus species for the production of the anti-cancer drug taxol. Although over-exploitation can lead to local extinction, the sustainable commercial and domestic use have the potential of increased incentives for forest conservation.

Fitzroya cupressoides

Fitzroya cupressoides© M.Gardner, RBGE

Taxa in the category - Cupressaceae:

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Athrotaxis cupressoides D.Don

Endemic to Tasmania where the main threats are fire, grazing of regeneration and dieback caused by Phytophthora Read full species entry >

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Athrotaxis selaginoides D.Don

One of two Athrotaxis species endemic to Tasmania where historically it has suffered from fire and logging. Today, even with protection, there is a continuing decline due to fire. Read full species entry >

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Callitris oblonga A.Rich. & Rich.

Endemic to Australia where it occurs on the mainland and Tasmania. Threats include  forest clearance, fire, grazing, invasive species and soil erosion. Read full species entry >

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Callitris sulcata (Parl.) Schltr.

One of two Callitris species endemic to New Caledonia; it is restricted to a few locations in the south of the main island of Grande Terre where its threatened by fire and logging Read full species entry >

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Calocedrus formosana (Florin) Florin

Endemic to Taiwan where the population has become severely fragmented through logging and forest clearance for agriculture. Read full species entry >

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Calocedrus macrolepis Kurz

A widespread species that has been exploited for timber and resin. Difficulties in estimating the extent of its decline and a lack of information about its staus is some parts of its range have resulted in an assessment of Near Threatened. Read full species entry >

Foliage
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Calocedrus rupestris Aver.,T.H.Nguyên & P.K.Lôc

Calocedrus rupestris was first described in 2008 from Việt Nam: prior to this Calocedrus trees occurring on limestone karst  were wrongly identified as Calocedrus macrolepis.  In 2011 C. rupestris was discovered in Guangxi. Threats include selective logging for timber, deforestation and forest degradation. Read full species entry >

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Chamaecyparis formosensis Matsum.

Endemic to Taiwan where logging for its valuable wood has been the main cause of decline in its population Read full species entry >

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